308 Congress Street, 5th Floor

Boston, Massachusetts 02210

info@empathways.org

Tel: 617-259-2900

Fax: 617-247-8826

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About EMPath

EMPath is a Boston-based nonprofit that disrupts poverty through direct services, advocacy and research, and a global learning network. The organization operates one of the largest congregate shelters in Massachusetts, in addition to varied other long-term programs throughout Greater Boston.

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Ten years ago, EMPath developed an approach to economic mobility coaching that is based on what science tells us about how the stresses of poverty challenge our ability to focus, plan ahead, and make future-oriented decisions. Steeped in this insight, Mobility Mentoring® is focused on personal, long-term goals related to:

Family Stability (housing, dependents)

Well-being (physical and mental health)

Finance (debts, savings)

Education & Training (educational attainment)

Employment & Career (earnings levels)

After seeing groundbreaking outcomes, EMPath created the Economic Mobility Exchange™—a learning network for human development and social service professionals. Network members include nonprofits, colleges, schools, health providers, and government agencies. The Exchange has expanded to 120+ member organizations from 28 states and four countries serving thousands of people. 

History of EMPath

Economic Mobility Pathways (EMPath) is descendant from a long line of Boston-based social service organizations. Most recently known as Crittenton Women’s Union (CWU), the present-day nonprofit was established in 2006 with the successful merger of two historic Boston nonprofit organizations: Crittenton, Inc. (founded in 1824) and the Women's Educational and Industrial Union (founded in 1877).
 

The 2006 merger brought together direct service programming expertise, research, and advocacy. In July 2016, CWU changed its name to EMPath to better reflect its focus on helping individuals and whole families find pathways toward economic self-sufficiency.